Rick Ross' Date Rape Song "UOENO" - Where's the Outrage?

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Every 2 minutes, someone in the U.S. is sexually assualted. Latinas are disproportionately affected by sexual assault and rape crimes. In 2011, reported rapes among Latina students (between the ages of 12 and 24) where the highest than any other ethnic group. In addition, 1 in 7 Hispanic women have experienced rape at some point in their lifetime, according to the National Rape Response Services. Apparently, Rick Ross doesn't seem to care.

The rapper and former law enforcement officer, who is known for spitting lyrics about gun violence and drugs, is now feeling the heat for a track promoting date rape titled, “U.O.E.N.O.” The song, which Ross collaborated along with Atlanta rapper Rocko and appears in the mixtape Gift of Gab 2, apparently features lyrics about drugging a woman and taking sexual advantage of her.

He raps, “Put molly all in her champagne/ She ain't even know it/ I took her home and I enjoyed that/ She ain't even know it.” Molly is a term used for the powder or crystal form of the substance Ecstasy, and is commonly used to "reduce inhibitions and to promote: euphoria, feelings of closeness, empathy, and sexuality," according to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

As Latinas, this strikes us as a new low even for the male-dominated world of hip-hop culture, which is known for objectifing and over-sexualizing women. Even more shocking, is the fact that only a few hip-hop journalists and pundits have addressed or criticized the controversial track. Hip-hop online personality ICE tweeted his disapproval, but overall only news outlets like Huffington Post and ABC have really given light to the issue.

Hip-hop publications have also remained as mum about the song as Ross himself (he has not tweeted or made a statement about the negative press). XXL and The Source, which both have female editors-in-chiefs, have reported facts about the matter, but have not made commentary or expressed outrage about the track. The same can't be said for music fans. A petition on Change.org has been posted to ban the song from continuing to hit radio waves.

In reality, Ross seems to be glorifying rape and masking it as artistic expression to gain more publicity and sell more albums, but at what cost? Do we want to market rape as a social norm among our youth and allow more incidents like the Steubenville, Ohio, rape case to occur? Planting these messages to our youth is dangerous given the rape culture that already exists throughout our nation.

This is a social issue that is already considered too taboo to address, which in turn leaves a lingering silence that shouldn’t be broken by a mediocre rapper supporting more violence against women. The world is already doing enough of that without your help, Ross.

What do you think about the controversial song?

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