Since the Parkland School Shooting A Number of School Shooting Suspects Have Been Arrested Across the Country

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In the wake of the recent school shooting in Parkland, Florida, authorities, and educators are not taking school threats lightly. After Nikolas Cruz killed 17 people from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School it was discovered that several warnings such as calls from concerned residents to police had not been addressed more seriously. The FBI had also been tipped off of the 19-year-old's odd behavior and threats but not enough had been done to prevent the mass shooting.

MORE: 7 Things to Know About Parkland Student Emma González

Following the shooting, cases of students being arrested for school shooting threats or for sneaking in weapons have been reported all over the country. The day after a sixth-grade student was arrested for leaving a threatening note warning that she would shoot the school. Days later a seventh-grade student from Ohio who intended to shoot the school, shot himself in the bathroom instead.

According to DailyMail.com, there have been reports of at least 38 different incidents in 20 different states since February 14.  

Many of the students were outed to authorities because of their posts on social media. On February 15, a teenage girl from Weatherford, Texas, allegedly posted on social media that she planned to cause harm at Weatherford High School. Although police did not find a weapon on her, she was charged with making a terroristic threat. 

In Maryland, a 14-year-old boy was arrested after bringing a pellet gun to school in Loch Raven High School on February 15.

In New Jersey, Nutley Public Schools closed as a result of a video posted on Instagram which they believed was a threat. 

The most recognizable threat came from a South Carolina student who posted on his Snapchat with a rifle and the caption "Round 2 of Florida tomorrow"

PLUS: Future President? WATCH as Florida School Shooting Survivor, Emma Gonzalez, Goes Viral As She Tells Donald Trump and the NRA "Shame on You!"

These threats made by students as young as ten years old calls for a call to action about how important it is to educate young people about the consequences of making dangerous threats.