Drug Violence Continues to Plague Mexico’s Northern Border

AP Photo/El Debate de Culiacn-Carla Sajaropulos

A dozen bound and tortured bodies were discovered dumped on the side of a remote highway in Michoacán. Police found the latest victims of the ongoing battle between rival drug traffickers on Monday.
A threatening message was located near the beaten bodies of 11 men and one woman piled up and wrapped in a tarp, police revealed at the scene. Sadly, this has become a frequent occurrence: Last week, police found four bodies and a menacing note in the same spot.

This reoccurring brutality stems from opposing drug cartels fighting over cocaine smuggling routes running up from Central America into the United States, the world's top drug consumer. Because Mexico's drug trade has become a very lucrative business—pulling in roughly $40 billion a year—having control of these routes ensures a hand in that money.

Despite thousands of Mexican troops dispatched to numerous drug hot spots throughout the country, bloodshed has not decreased. U.S. authorities, worried that the violence will spill over the border, have offered a helping hand, pledging $1.4 billion through the Merida initiative in an attempt to help Mexico combat the cartels.

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