Is Your Vibrator Ruining Your Sex Life?

Afraid your vibrator has made enjoying sex with your partner impossible? Worried using a vibrator will break your nether region? Forget what you thought you knew about your favorite battery operated device. The art of getting off can be uncomfortable to talk about, so we’ve done the work for you. We talked to Dr. Jessica Ton to shatter the stigma and answer your questions about your female pleasure station so you can learn more about what makes your body tick…or vibrate. 

1. Is it easier for women to orgasm with a vibrator?

Is it easier for women to orgasm with a vibrator?

Yes, it can be easier for a woman to achieve the big “O” without their partner—sometimes your vibrator just knows how to hit all of the right spots. Besides, we tend to know more about our own bodies than the guys do, right? But Dr. Jessica Ton, a second year resident in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the George Washington University Hospital, reminds us that orgasms via our vibrators isn’t always more enjoyable. “There is more to an orgasm than just the physical sensation. When experiencing an orgasm with another person, there is also the emotional aspect which can’t necessarily be reproduced with a vibrator.”


2. Does using a vibrator ruin my ability to get orgasm with my partner?

Does using a vibrator ruin my ability to get orgasm with my partner?

Some women believe that regular use of their vibrator ruins any chances of finding pleasure with their partner in the bedroom. Luckily for us, the opposite is true! The more orgasms you have, the more likely you are to have them during intercourse. “A vibrator produces a specific orgasm related to clitoral stimulation,” said Dr. Ton. “But your partner can also help you achieve orgasm with clitoral or penetrative stimulation. The physical sensations might be similar to your vibrator, but over time you will develop a unique type of orgasm with your partner based on your emotional connection.” 


3. Does using a vibrator desensitize my vagina?

Does using a vibrator desensitize my vagina?

Treat your vagina with care, and you don’t have to worry about breaking it. “The clitoris is capable of multiple orgasms in one session when using a vibrator,” stated Dr. Ton. “However, if you traumatize your clitoris with repetitive burning, piercing and pinching, that can lead to desensitization over time.” In other words: Go forth and orgasm, just remember to treat your clitoris how you’d want to be treated!


4. Is there such a thing as a vibrator that’s two big?

Is there such a thing as a vibrator that’s two big?

Oh the age old question: Is there such a thing as “too big”? Dr. Ton says yes and no. Our vaginas are built tough. We were designed for vaginal childbirth, after all, so our va-jay-jays are prepared to accommodate many shapes and sizes. That being said, some vibrators are simply too big. Start with a vibrator that is close in size to that of your male partner, if you have one. If you’re a virgin or post menopausal, you should be especially sensitive to size to avoid vaginal tears that can land you in the ER getting your hoo-ha stitched up. Dr. Ton adds, “When practicing penetrative intercourse with a vibrator, always go slowly to give time for your vagina to accommodate—and always use plenty of water-based lubricant!”


5. Is it possible to overuse my vibrator?

Is it possible to overuse my vibrator? 

The answer is no. This is just another place we have a leg up on our male counterparts! “Unlike men who can deplete their sperm count if they ejaculate too frequently, the clitoris can be stimulated for climax as much as is comfortable to you in one encounter,” admitted Dr. Ton. Really, ladies, it’s a miracle we leave our beds at all.


6. Is it safe to use household items to pleasure myself?

Is it safe to use household items to pleasure myself?

Maybe you live in fear of your parents or your significant other finding your vibrator hiding in the back of your closet. Maybe you live in fear of buying one in the first place! Whatever the reason, women have used everything from facial exfoliators to showerheads to candles to give themselves a little bit of personal lovin’. But is this safe? Dr. Ton asks us to err on the side of caution, “Stick to what is specifically designed for sexual intercourse. Your household objects are ‘fomites’ meaning they’re frequently touched and accumulate lots of bacteria—so it’s not the most hygienic method. If you do use something else, make sure to cover it with a condom to ensure it’s sterile, and use water-based, odorless sterile lubricants to reduce your chance of infection or allergic reaction.” 


7. Can I get STIs from using my vibrator?

Can I get STIs from using my vibrator?

The answer to this one is a resounding YES. Dr. Ton warns us that using a vibrator with our partner(s) will not protect us against pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections like gonorrhea, chlamydia, herpes, Hepatitis, and HIV. “Get tested regularly for STIs,” insists Dr. Ton. “If left untreated, they can damage your Fallopian tubes leading to difficulty getting pregnant in the future and increasing your risk of an ectopic pregnancy. If diagnosed with an STI, don’t forget to tell all of your partners that they need to get treated as well. And do not have sex until both partners are cured.” 


8. Does using a vibrator provide any health benefits?

Does using a vibrator provide any health benefits? 

Sure, there are a few things to look out for when choosing and using your satisfying toy, but enjoying time with a vibrator helps you become better in tune with your body and what makes you tick. “Sexual health and awareness is a vital part of general health and well being,” said Dr. Ton. “It can help women understand their bodies and what they are capable of in terms of orgasm and penetrative intercourse. It can also provide an additional dimension to their sexual relationship with their partners.”

 

Jessica Ton is a physician in her second year of residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the George Washington University Hospital Washington, D.C. The views and opinions expressed are hers alone, and do not necessarily reflect those of the residency program or its affiliate hospitals.