103 Latino Oscar Nominees!

It’s the ultimate prize in Hollywood: the Oscar. Granted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the coveted Academy Award statuettes have been doled out annually since 1929 as an award “of merit for distinctive achievement" in the industry. But it wasn’t until nearly 20 years later that the first Latino earned an Academy Award nomination.

Since then though, more than 100 Latinos in the film industry have had a date with Oscar, with many of them – like José Ferrer, Rita Moreno and Javier Bardem – even getting to take the statuette home. As this year’s nominees are announced, including a first-time nod for costume designer Paco Delgado, here’s a comprehensive look at the history of Latinos and the Academy Awards!

1. oscars_1_jose ferrer

It’s no wonder José Ferrer’s life and accomplishments have been commemorated on a First-Class Forever stamp by the U.S. Postal Service as part of its Distinguished Americans stamp series. The Puerto Rican actor was the first Latino to win an Academy Award. Ferrer, a three-time nominee, lost in his first at-bat (Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of the weak-willed Dauphin opposite Ingrid Bergman in Joan of Arc in 1948) before taking home the Best Actor prize for his performance in the title role of Cyrano de Bergerac, which earned him a Tony Award after first playing the role on Broadway in 1946. To honor his roots, he donated his Oscar to the University of Puerto Rico.

Best Supporting Actor, Joan of Arc, 21st Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Actor, Cyrano de Bergerac, 23rd Academy Awards, Won
Best Actor, Moulin Rouge, 25th Academy Awards, Nominated

2. oscars_36_Ary Barroso

Composer Ary Barroso – one of Brazil's most successful songwriters in the first half of the 20th century – earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song for penning the song “Rio de Janeiro” with Ned Washington for the 1945 film Brazil, a musical comedy set in the South American country about a composer masquerading as twins, trying to win the hand of an anti-Latin novelist. Barroso was the first Brazilian and the first Latin American songwriter to be nominated for an Oscar.

Best Original Song, Brazil, 17th Academy Awards, Nominated

3. oscars_9_Katy Jurado

Long before Salma Hayek conquered Hollywood, Katy Jurado was one of Mexico’s first successful crossover actresses. Jurado, who’d already established herself as a star in her native country in the 1940s, came to Hollywood and became a regular fixture in Western films of the 1950s and ’60s. Born María Cristina Estela Marcela Jurado García, she became the first Latin American actress nominated for an Academy Award for her work as Native American princess Señora Devereaux in 1954's Broken Lance, and was the first Latin American actress to win a Golden Globe award.

Best Supporting Actress, Broken Lance, 27th Academy Awards, Nominated

4. oscars_37_Thomas Gomez

In 1947, Thomas Gomez made history as the first Latino to earn an Oscar nomination. The U.S.-born actor of Spanish descent, who was born Sabino Tomas Gomez, received a Best Supporting Actor nod for his portrayal of Pancho, a carousel operator in Ride the Pink Horse, “the wise fool, the peasant with a heart of gold.” In the New Mexico-set film, Gomez speaks broken English through a missing front tooth, runs around barefoot and unshaven, and wears a tattered sombrero. "Thomas Gomez is a big, greasy, tequila-swilling slob, who has one brief glow of nobility," said Universal’s publicity department of the actor’s portrayal of a character that would spark controversy today.

Best Supporting Actor, Ride the Pink Horse, 20th Academy Awards, Nominated

5. oscars_13_Rosie Perez

Rosie Pérez is fearless when it comes to her acting roles. The Nuyorican actress has been impressing audiences and critics alike in films like Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing and White Men Can’t Jump. But it was her performance as Carla Rodrigo – a plane crash survivor who lost her baby son in the tragedy and struggles with survivor's guilt – in Peter Weir's 1993 film Fearless that earned Pérez a much-deserved Oscar nomination.

Best Supporting Actress, Fearless, 66th Academy Awards, Nominated

6. oscars_10_Susan Kohner

Susan Kohner was born to act. The daughter of Mexican actress Lupita Tovar appeared in numerous films during the late 1950s and early ’60s. Her most notable role, as the racially ambiguous Sarah Jane in the 1959 color remake of Imitation of Life, starring Lana Turner, was a box office smash that earned Kohner an Academy Award nomination and won her the Golden Globe in the Best Supporting Actress categories.

Best Supporting Actress, Imitation of Life, 32nd Academy Awards, Nominated

7. oscars_2_anthony quinn

Oscar’s most recognized Latino actor with four nominations remains Anthony Quinn, who became the first Mexican actor to win an Academy Award at for his supporting role as the brother of Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata in 1952’s fictional biopic Viva Zapata! He’d later become the first Latino to win two Oscars in the same category after winning Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of French Post-Impressionist artist Paul Gauguin in Lust for Life, a biographical film about the life of Vincent van Gogh.

Best Supporting Actor, Viva Zapata!, 25th Academy Awards, Won
Best Supporting Actor, Lust for Life, 29th Academy Awards, Won
Best Actor, Wild Is the Wind, 30th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Actor, Zorba the Greek, 37th Academy Awards, Nominated

8. oscars_16_Emile Kuri

If you’re looking for Oscar’s all-star set decorator, look no further than Emile Kuri. The Mexico-born set director of Lebanese descent won two Academy Awards during his illustrious career. Not only did Kuri win a Best Art Direction trophy his work on 1942’s The Heiress, he also won for his set decoration on 1954’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. In addition, Kuri was nominated for six more Oscars in the category, including work on the Walt Disney classics Mary Poppins and Bedknobs and Broomsticks.

Best Art Direction, Silver Queen, 15th Academy Awards,  Nominated
Best Art Direction, The Heiress, 22nd Academy Awards, Won
Best Art Direction, Carrie, 25th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Art Direction, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, 27th Academy Awards, Won
Best Art Direction, Executive Suite, 27th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Art Direction, The Absent-Minded Professor, 34th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Art Direction, Mary Poppins, 37th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Art Direction, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, 44th Academy Awards,  Nominated

9. oscars_39_Antoni Clave

Talk about pulling double duty without skipping a beat. Spanish stage designer and costume designer Antoni Clavé – one of Spain’s most celebrated artists – earned two Academy Award nominations (Best Art Direction and Best Costume Design) in the same year for his work on the 1952 musical Hans Christian Andersen, a fictional, romantic story revolving around the life of the famous Danish poet and storyteller Hans Christian Andersen.

Best Art Direction, Hans Christian Andersen, 25th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Costume Design, Hans Christian Andersen, 25th Academy Awards, Nominated

10. oscars_38_Juan Antonio Bardem

Javier Bardem isn’t the only Oscar-worthy person in the family. His uncle Juan Antonio Bardem actually earned an Academy Award nomination first, in the Best Foreign Language Film category for directing the controversial Spanish drama La Venganza. The film, which was shown at the 1958 Cannes Film Festival, wasn’t released in his native country until the following year. The film had serious troubles with Spanish censorship; Bardem even went to prison in what became an international scandal. The film was the first Spanish-language film to be nominated for an Oscar.

Best Foreign Language Film, La Venganza, 31st Academy Awards, Nominated

11. oscars_40_Roberto Gavaldón

Mexican director Roberto Gavaldón’s 1960 supernatural drama Macario, starring Ignacio López Tarso, was the first Mexican film to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The film, which was also entered into the 1960 Cannes Film Festival, received criticism in Mexico at the time of its release because it was considered a film made for the foreign viewer. Macario was released when Mexico was experiencing a nationalist era of cinema.

Best Foreign Language Film, Macario, 33rd Academy Awards, Nominated

12. oscars_41_Luis Garcia Berianga

Spanish director Luis García Berlanga, considered to be one of the most noted Spanish film renovators after the Spanish civil war, earned his only Academy Award nomination for the 1961 Spanish black comedy Plácido. In addition, Berlanga’s film received the Gold Medal for Fine Art (Medalla de Oro de las Bellas Artes) in 1981, the Spanish National Cinematography Prize (Premio Nacional de Cinematografía) in 1980, and has been granted with the Italian Commendatore Order.

Best Foreign Language Film, Plácido, 34th Academy Awards, Nominated

13. oscars_11_Rita Moreno

It’s no easy feat filling Broadway diva Chita Rivera’s (dance) shoes in her critically acclaimed role of Anita in West Side Story. But Rita Moreno did that and more in the 1961 film adaptation of the hit Broadway musical. The Puerto Rican actress not only earned rave reviews for her portrayal of spitfire Anita, but she won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress at the 34th Academy Awards. Moreno was the first Puerto Rican actress to be nominated for an Oscar, and the first Latina actress to win an Academy Award.

Best Supporting Actress, West Side Story, 34th Academy Awards, Won

14. oscars_42_Ismael Rodriguez

Mexican filmmaker Ismael Rodríguez directed many of Mexico’s acting royalty, including Pedro Infante, Dolores del Río, María Félix. But it was his work with Japanese actor Toshirō Mifune, starring as a Mexican Indian in the film Ánimas Trujano, that earned him an Academy Award nomination, in the Best Foreign Language Film category. The film’s title character is a boisterous, irresponsible Amerindian who aspires to become mayordomo of his village.

Best Foreign Language Film, Ánimas Trujano, 34th Academy Awards, Nominated

15. oscars_43_Anselmo Duarte

Brazilian filmmaker Anselmo Duarte’s O Pagador de Promessas, a 1962 drama, which he adapted the screenplay himself from the famous stage play written by Dias Gomes, won the Palme d'Or at the 1962 Cannes Film Festival, becoming the first Brazilian film to achieve that feat. A year later, it also became the first Brazilian and South American film nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

Best Foreign Language Film, O Pagador de Promessas, 35th Academy Awards, Nominated

16. oscars_44_Luis Alcoriza

Mexican filmmaker Luis Alcoriza’s 1962 Mexican comedy Tlayucan earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film. The film, based on a novel by Jesús Murciélago Velázquez, starred the biggest names in Mexican cinema including Andrés Soler, Noé Murayama and Anita Blanch.

Best Foreign Language Film, Tlayucan, 35th Academy Awards, Nominated

17. oscars_45_Francisco Rovira Beleta

Spanish filmmaker Francisco Rovira Beleta earned two Academy Awards during his lauded career for his art-based projects. Beleta garnered the first nod, in the Best Foreign Language Film category, for directing the 1963 Spanish musical drama Los Tarantos, based on the play La historia de los Tarantos written by Alfredo Mañas, and inspired by William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. He then earned his second nod four years later in the same category for directing the drama El Amor Brujo, which was based on the eponymous ballet by Manuel de Falla.

Best Foreign Language Film, Los Tarantos, 36th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, El Amor Brujo, 40th Academy Awards, Nominated

18. oscars_22_Gabriel Figueroa

He’s regarded as one of the most influential cinematographers in Mexico for good reason. Along with working on more than 250 high-profile projects on both sides of the border, Gabriel Figueroa earned an Academy Award nomination for his work on The Night of the Iguana, a 1964 black-and-white film based on Tennessee Williams’ play of the same name and starring Richard Burton, Ava Gardner and Deborah Kerr. Time magazine called it “a picture that excites the senses, persuades the mind, and even occasionally speaks to the spirit—one of the best movies ever made from a Tennessee Williams play.”

Best Cinematography, The Night of the Iguana, 37th Academy Awards, Nominated

19. oscars_46_Luis Enriquez Bacalov

Prolific Argentine film composer Luis Enríquez Bacalov – who began his career composing scores for Spaghetti Westerns and collaborated with Italian progressive rock bands in the early 1970s – has been nominated twice for an Academy Award for Original Score—for music adaptation or treatment— in 1967 for The Gospel According to St. Matthew, and winning the Oscar nearly 30 years later for Il Postino in 1996.

Best Adaptation or Score Treatment, The Gospel According to St. Matthew, 39th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Original Dramatic Score, Il Postino, 68th Academy Awards, Won 

20. oscars_47_Jorge Semprun

Jorge Semprún, a Spanish writer and politician who lived in France most of his life and wrote primarily in French, earned the first of his two Academy Award nominations for penning La guerre est finie, a French drama about a leftist in Franco's Spain. He followed up his Best Original Screenplay nod with a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination for penning the French-language political thriller Z with the film’s director Costa-Gavras.

Best Original Screenplay, La guerre est finie (The War is Over), 40th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay, Z, 42nd Academy Awards, Nominated

21. oscars_31_Alberto Isaac

Mexican filmmaker Alberto Isaac managed to cash in on the excitement surrounding the 1968 Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City – the first to be staged in Latin America, the first to be held in a Spanish-speaking country and the first to be staged in a developing country – to turn the Games’ official film into an international hit. In the process, Isaac earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary Feature.

Best Documentary Feature, Olimpiada en México, 42nd Academy Awards, Nominated

22. oscars_48_Gil Parrondo & Antonio Mateos

Spanish art director, set decorator and production designer Gil Parrondo teamed up with fellow Spaniard Antonio Mateos and Urie McCleary and Pierre-Louis Thevenet to create the sets for Best Picture winner Patton, a biographical war film about U.S. General George S. Patton during World War II. The quarter would win an Oscar for Best Art Direction for their striking set design work. Parrondo would win a second Academy Award in the category for his work on the period drama Nicholas and Alexandra the following year, and he’d earn another nomination a year later for his work on Travels with My Aunt.

Best Art Direction, Patton, 43rd Academy Awards, Won
Best Art Direction, Nicholas and Alexandra, 44th Academy Awards, Won
Best Art Direction, Travels with My Aunt, 45th Academy Awards, Nominated 

23. oscars_49_Luis Bunuel

The New York Times once called Luis Buñuel "an iconoclast, moralist and revolutionary who was a leader of avant-garde surrealism in his youth and a dominant international movie director half a century later.” The Aragonese filmmaker, who worked in Spain, Mexico and France, earned four Academy Award nomination during his career. His first, in the Best Foreign Language Film category, came for directing Tristana. His final two nominated came in the same year, for co-writing and directing the critically acclaimed film Ese oscuro objeto del deseo.

Best Foreign Language Film, Tristana, 43rd Academy Awards, Nominated
Best original Screenplay, Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie, 45th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, Ese oscuro objeto del deseo, 50th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay, Ese oscuro objeto del deseo, 50th Academy Awards, Nominated

24. oscars_50_Robert Amran & Manuel Arango

Mexican filmmakers Robert Amran and Manuel Arango made history at the 44th Academy Awards. The pair picked up the Oscar for Best Documentary Short and the prize for Best Live Action Short. Centinelas del silencio (Sentinels of Silence), which provides an 18-minute helicopter-based aerial visit across the archeological ruins in Mexico, the first and only short film to win two Academy Awards (narrated by Ricardo Montalban, seen above).

Best Documentary Short, Centinelas del silencio, 44th Academy Awards, Won
Best Live Action Short, Centinelas del silencio, 44th Academy Awards, Won

25. oscars_51_Yvonne Blake & Antonio Castillo

British-born Spanish costume designer Yvonne Blake and Spanish costume designer Antonio Castillo paired up to create the looks for Nicholas and Alexandra, a period piece about the last Russian monarch, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, and his wife, Tsarina Alexandra. The duo earned rave reviews and won the Oscar for Best Costume Design at the 44th Academy Awards. Blake would earn a second Academy Award nomination for her costumes design work with Ron Talsky on The Four Musketeers.

Best Costume Design, Nicholas and Alexandra, 44th Academy Awards, Won
Best Costume Design, The Four Musketeers, 48th Academy Awards, Nominated

26. oscars_52_Jaime de Armiñán

Jaime de Armiñán’s first two directorial attempts came and went with little fanfare, but the Spanish screenwriter-turned-director’s third effort seemed to be the charm. Entitled Mi querida señorita, the film centers on repressed provincial spinster who late in life discovers that she’s really a man and moves to the city to explore his new sexual identity. Mi Querida Señorita, a critical and popular success, was nominated for Academy Award in the Foreign Language film category. Armiñán would earn his second Oscar nod in the category nearly a decade later for helming El Nido.

Best Foreign Language Film, Mi querida señorita, 45th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, El Nido, 53rd Academy Awards, Nominated

27. oscars_53_Sergio Renan

Argentine director Sergio Renán’s La tregua – a 1974 film co-written with Aída Bortnik, based on the eponymous novel by Mario Benedetti – was the first Argentine film to be nominated for an Academy Award, for Best Foreign Language Film. The film lost out Federico Fellini’s Amarcord, but has since gained cult status in Argentina.

Best Foreign Language Film, La tregua, 47th Academy Awards, Nominated

28. oscars_54_Miguel Littin

Talk about representing Latin America. Chilean filmmaker Miguel Littín is the only Latin American director to receive Academy Award nominations in the Best Foreign Language Film category for movies directed in two different countries. Littín earned his first nod for the 1975 Mexican film Actas de Marusia, and picked up his second nomination for the 1982 Nicaraguan film Alsino y el Condor.

Best Foreign Language Film, Actas de Marusia, 48th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, Alsino and the Condor, 55th Academy Awards, Nominated

29. oscars_55_Nestor Almendros

Spanish cinematographer Néstor Almendros – who won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work on Terrence Mallick’s 1978 romantic drama Days of Heaven, starring Richard Gere and Brooke Adams – was one of the industry’s highest praised contemporary cinematographers. "Almendros was an artist of deep integrity, who believed the most beautiful light was natural light...he will always be remembered as a cinematographer of absolute truth...a true master of light,” declared director Rustin Thompson. Almendros would go on to earn three more Oscar nominations, for his cinematography on Kramer vs. Kramer, The Blue Lagoon and Sophie’s Choice.

Best Cinematography, Days of Heaven, 51st Academy Awards, Won
Best Cinematography, Kramer vs. Kramer, 52nd Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Cinematography, The Blue Lagoon, 53rd Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Cinematography, Sophie’s Choice, 55th Academy Awards, Nominated

30. oscars_56_Carlos Saura

Carlos Saura earned his first Academy Award nomination in the Best Foreign Language Film category for the 1979 Spanish comedy Mamá cumple cien años, about a stubborn mother who becomes the intended victim of a murder plot when he refuses her family’s requests to sell her home. A few years later, the Spanish film director and photographer earned yet another nod in the category for his 1983 film adaptation of the novel Carmen by Prosper Mérimée, using music from the opera Carmen by Georges Bizet. The film didn’t win the Oscar, but it did earn Saura a BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Language Film. Saura earned his third Academy Award nod in the category for 1998’s Argentine-Spanish dance film Tango, which was promoted as the most expensive Argentine film ever made.

Best Foreign Language Film, Mamá cumple cien años, 52nd Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, Carmen, 56th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, Tango, 71st Academy Awards, Nominated

31. oscars_34_Jorge Preloran

Argentine filmmaker Jorge Preloran, a pioneer in ethno biographic film making, and Richard Hawkins earned an Academy Award nomination in the Best Documentary Short category for directing Luther Metke at 94, a film that presents a portrait of Luther Metke, a veteran of the Spanish-American war. Even in his advanced age, Metke continues his work of building log cabins by hand in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. The film documents many aspects of log cabin building as Metke works on a hexagonal cabin and teaches his methods to a young couple. Additional footage shows Metke's daily life, accompanied by a voice over of his recollections, commentary on log cabin construction, and musings on life.

Best Documentary Short, Luther Metke at 94, 53rd Academy Awards, Nominated

 

32. oscars_57_Jose Luis Garci

José Luis Garci made Oscar history at the 55th Academy Awards when the film he directed, Volver a empezar, won the prize for Best Foreign Language Film, making it Spain’s first film to win in the category. The Spanish filmmaker would go on to earn three additional nods in the category, more than any other Spanish director. Garci’s films are characterized by his classical style and the underlying sentimentality of their plots.

Best Foreign Language Film, Volver a empezar, 55th Academy Awards, Won
Best Foreign Language Film,  Sesión continua, 57th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, Asignatura aprobada, 60th Academy Awards,  Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, El Abuelo, 71st Academy Awards, Nominated

33. oscars_58_Maria Luisa Bemberg

María Luisa Bemberg – one of the first Latin American women film directors, and a powerful presence in the intellectual Argentina of 1970-1990 – earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film for her critically acclaimed film Camila, which based on the story of the 19th-century Argentine socialite Camila O'Gorman. The story had previously been adapted by Mario Gallo in 1910, in the now considered lost film Camila O'Gorman. It was the first nomination for Best Foreign Language Film to a film directed by a Latin American woman director.

Best Foreign Language Film, Camila, 57th Academy Awards, Nominated

34. oscars_59_Gregory Nava

He may be best known for directing Jennifer Lopez in Selena. But before bringing la Reina de la Música Tejana’s story to life, Gregory Nava co-wrote and directed the independent film El Norte, the story of two indigenous youths who flee their country in the early 1980s due to ethnic and political persecution during the Guatemalan Civil War. They head north and travel through Mexico to the United States, arriving in Los Angeles, California, after an arduous journey. The Mexican/Basque filmmaker and Anna Thomas’ screenplay earned an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay, the first American independent film to be so honored. The film was later selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Best Original Screenplay, El Norte (The North), 57th Academy Awards, Nominated

35. oscars_28_Héctor Babenco

He’s directed some of the most respected American actors in cinema, including Jack Nicholson, Meryl Streep and Kathy Bates. But Héctor Babenco’s most rewarding work came while directing William Hurt, Raúl Juliá, Sonia Braga in Kiss of the Spider Woman, which was adapted from Manuel Puig’s novel of the same name. The film earned the Argentine-born Brazilian director an Academy Award nomination for Best Director.

Best Director, Kiss of the Spider Woman, 58th Academy Awards, Nominated

 

36. oscars_60_Luis Puenzo

Argentine director Luis Puenzo’s 1985 drama The Official Story made history at the 58th Academy Awards by winning the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. The Spanish-language tale about the Argentine Dirty War, which had recently ceased, denounced the atrocities of the country’s military regime and made the brutal dictatorships known worldwide. It became the first Latin American film to win for Best Foreign Language Film. In addition, Puenzo earned an Oscar nomination for penning the screenplay.

Best Foreign Language Film, The Official Story, 58th Academy Awards, Won
Best Original Screenplay, The Official Story, 58th Academy Awards, Nominated

37. oscars_61_Jorge Calandrelli

He’s worked on arrangements for some of music’s brightest stars, including Barbra Streisand, Andrea Bocelli, Celine Dion and Luis Miguel. But Jorge Calandrelli’s most memorable work came on two film projects that earned him respect in Hollywood. The Argentine composer, a Latin Grammy winner for Producer of the Year, earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Score as a composer on 1985’s The Color Purple. And he earned an Oscar nod 15 years later for Best Original Song for writing the music to “A Love Before Time," a track for 2000’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

Best Original Score, The Color Purple, 58th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Original Song, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, 73rd Academy Awards, Nominated 

38. oscars_62_Aida Bortnik

Screenwriter Aída Bortnik is her country’s lucky guionista. She has the noted distinction of having penned the screenplay for both the first Argentine film nominated for an Academy Award (The Truce, 1974) and the first Argentine film to win an Oscar (La historia oficial, 1985). Bortnik, who co-wrote the script for La historia oficial with the film’s director Luis Puenzo, earned an Academy Award nod for Best Original Screenplay for her work.

Best Original Screenplay, The Official Story, 58th Academy Awards, Nominated

39. oscars_12_Norma Aleandro

Following her success in Argentine films like the Academy Award-winning film The Official Story – which earned her a Cannes Award for best actress – Norma Aleandro starred in numerous Hollywood pictures. Most notably, she appeared in the 1988 drama Gaby: A True Story, about Mexican writer and disability rights activist Gabriela Brimmer.  Aleandro’s performance earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting actress, making her the first Argentine actress to be nominated for an Academy Award.

Best Supporting Actress, Gaby: A True Story, 60th Academy Awards, Nominated

40. oscars_63_Pedro Almodovar

Pedro Almodóvar – considered the most successful and internationally renowned Spanish filmmaker of his generation – has said that he’s been heavily influenced by old Hollywood movies in which everything happens around a female main character. In continuing that tradition, Almodóvar has earned international acclaim while reaping several rewards, including some serious Oscar love. Almodóvar earned his first Academy Award nomination in the Best Foreign Language Film category for directing Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios, the first huge international hit of his career. About 10 years later, he won his first Oscar for Todo sobre mi madre in the Best Foreign Language Film category. Three years later he won the Best Original Screenplay prize and landed a Best Director nod for helming Hable con ella.

Best Foreign Language Film, Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios, 61st Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, Todo sobre mi madre, 72nd Academy Awards, Won
Best Original Screenplay, Hable con ella, 75th Academy Awards, Won
Best Director, Hable con ella, 75th Academy Awards, Nominated

41. oscars_64_Edward James Olmos

Long before his memorable television roles in Battlestar Galactica and Dexter, Edward James Olmos earned rave reviews for his portrayal of real-life high school math teacher Jaime Escalante in Stand and Deliver, an inspirational film that was added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 2011. The Mexican American actor earned the only Academy Award nomination of his career for his stellar work in the film, in the Best Actor category. Olmos later founded Latino Public Broadcasting, which funds public television programming that focuses on issues affecting Latinos and advocates for diverse perspectives in public television

Best Actor, Stand and Deliver, 61st Academy Awards, Nominated

42. oscars_65_Jacobo Morales

Lo que le pasó a Santiago, written and directed by Puerto Rican filmmaker Jacobo Morales, earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film, making it the first Puerto Rican production in history to be nominated in the category. The movie tells the story of a recently retired widower who meets a mysterious young lady in his life, disrupting his daily routines. Despite losing the Oscar, Morales did win a Premio ACE award for Best Director – Cinema.

Best Foreign Language Film, Lo que le pasó a Santiago, 62nd Academy Awards, Nominated

43. oscars_4_Andy Garcia

Credit Brian De Palma's crime-drama The Untouchables for bringing Andy García a major break. The film, which centers on the efforts to bring gang leader Al Capone to justice during the Prohibition era, helped the Cuban-born actor get noticed and ultimately land the role of Vincent Mancini, the illegitimate son of Sonny Corleone, in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather Part III. García’s performance earned him a Best Supporting Actor nomination. He was the only actor in the film to earn Academy Award recognition, including Al Pacino, who’d earned Oscar nods in the previous two Godfather films.

Best Supporting Actor, The Godfather: Part III, 63rd Academy Awards, Nominated

44. oscars_66_Mercedes Ruehl

Sure, Mercedes Ruehl’s performance in Married to the Mob earned her rave reviews. But it was her critically acclaimed work in the dramedy The Fisher King that earned the part-Cuban American actress an Academy Award. Ruehl, a multiple Tony Award winner, won the coveted Oscar in her first and only nomination – for her portraying Jeff Bridges’ character’s girlfriend, Anne, in the film that "sweeps you up on waves of humor, heartbreak and ravishing romance," according to one critic. Ruehl remains the only U.S.-born Hispanic actor to win an Academy Award.

Best Supporting Actress, The Fisher King, 64th Academy Awards, Won

45. oscars_67_Fernando Trueba & Javier Mariscal

Noted Spanish filmmaker Fernando Trueba earned an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film for directing the 1992 Spanish-language classic Belle Époque, which stars a young Penélope Cruz in one of her first films. Belle Époque received the Goya Award for Best Film, along with eight other Goya Awards, becoming one of the country’s most celebrated films. Trueba would earn a second Oscar nomination nearly 20 years later when he partnered with Spanish artist Javier Mariscal to co-direct 2010’s Chico & Rita, a Spanish animated feature-length film, which earned a Best Animated Feature nod. It was the first time a Spanish full-length animated film was nominated.

Best Foreign Language Film, Belle Époque, 66th Academy Awards, Won
Best Animated Feature, Chico & Rita, 84th Academy Awards, Nominated 

46. oscars_68_Tomás Gutiérrez Alea &Juan Carlos Tabío

Tomás Gutiérrez Alea and Juan Carlos Tabío’s Fresa y chocolate (Strawberry and Chocolate) made Academy Award history when the film earned a Best Foreign Language Film nomination. The film – which centers on a cultivated, homosexual and skeptical young man who falls in love with a young heterosexual communist full of prejudices and doctrinary ideas – is the first and only Cuban film to be nominated in the category.

Best Foreign Language Film, Fresa y chocolate (Strawberry and Chocolate), 67th Academy Awards, Nominated

47. oscars_23_Emmanuel Lubezki

Emmanuel Lubezki is the Susan Lucci of cinematographers. The Mexican filmmaker, known for his groundbreaking techniques and characteristic style, is a five time Academy Award nominee. But Lubezki, who frequently collaborates with fellow Mexican filmmaker Alfonso Cuarón, has yet to take home an Oscar. Lubezki received his first nomination for 1995’s A Little Princess; and he earned his most recent nod for 2011’s The Tree of Life. He could earn another nod for his work on Cuarón’s latest project Gravity, which stars Sandra Bullock and George Clooney as surviving astronauts in a damaged space station.

Best Cinematography, A Little Princess, 68th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Cinematography, Sleepy Hollow, 72nd Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Cinematography, The New World, 78th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Cinematography,  Children of Men, 79th Academy Awards,  Nominated
Best Cinematography, The Tree of Life, 84th Academy Awards, Nominated

48. oscars_17_Eugenio Zanetti

Eugenio Zanetti created award-winning set designs in his native Argentina for films like Mario Sábato's The Power of Darkness before relocating to Los Angeles to pursue a career in Hollywood as a production designer. Zanetti won an Academy Award for his work on the historical drama Restoration, which starred Robert Downey Jr. and Meg Ryan. He’d follow that up with an Oscar nod for his production design work on What Dreams May Come.

Best Art Direction, Restoration, 68th Academy Awards, Won
Best Art Direction, What Dreams May Come, 71st Academy Awards, Nominated

49. oscars_18_Brigitte Broch

If at first you don’t succeed... Brigitte Broch earned an Academy Award nomination in the Best Art Direction category for her work on Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet in 2006, a modernized adaptation of William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes. The Germany-born Mexican art director would leave empty-handed. But after partnering with Luhrmann on the hit musical Moulin Rouge! some five years later, Broch would finally experience Oscar glory at its finest. In recent years, she’s even work with noted Mexican filmmakers Alfonso Cuarón and Guillermo del Toro.

Best Art Direction, Romeo + Juliet, 69th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Art Direction, Moulin Rouge!, 74th Annual Awards, Won

50. oscars_69_Antonio Urrutia

The third time proved to be the charm for Mexican filmmaker Antonio Urrutia… After writing and directing two acclaimed Spanish-language short films (La aventura and Amor por menos), he finally earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Live Action Short for his 1996 film De tripas, corazón.

Best Live Action Short Film, De tripas, corazón, 69th Academy Awards, Nominated

51. oscars_70_Juan Carlos Fresnadillo

Before directing the Spanish thriller Intacto and 28 Weeks Later, the sequel to Danny Boyle's post-apocalyptic horror film 28 Days Later, Spanish filmmaker Juan Carlos Fresnadillo earned an Academy Award nomination in the Best Live Action Short category for his debut film, the black-and-white short Esposados. The black comedy about a couple who constantly fight over money; when they find themselves winning the Christmas lottery, however, they have very different ideas about what to do next that the husband tries to get rid of his wife. The film won 40 national and international awards and made Fresnadillo an instant star in Spain.

Best Live Action Short, Esposados , 69th Academy Awards, Nominated

52. oscars_71_Bruno Barreto

Bruno Barreto earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film for 1997’s Brazilian thriller O Que É Isso, Companheiro?. The Portuguese film, based on the 1979 memoir of the same name by politician Fernando Gabeira, tells the true story of the abduction of the American ambassador Charles Burke Elbrick in 1969 by the MR-8 group, in which Gabeira and his friends participated.

Best Foreign Language Film, O Que É Isso, Companheiro?, 70th Academy Awards, Nominated 

53. oscars_72_Walter Salles

The fourth film of Brazilian filmmaker Walter Salles career, 1998’s Central do Brasil (Central Station) earned him widespread international acclaim and 55 international awards, as well as an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film. And the Brazilian-French drama about an unlikely friendship earned the film’s lead, Fernanda Montenegro an Oscar nod for Best Actress. Salles would go on to direct 2004’s The Motorcycle Diaries and 2012’s On The Road, among other films.

Best Foreign Language Film, Central do Brasil, 71st Academy Awards, Nominated 

54. oscars_6_Fernanda Montenegro

She’s commonly referred to as "The First Lady of Brazilian Theater" and "The First Lady of Brazilian Television," but Fernanda Montenegro earned recognition beyond her country when she garnered a Best Actress nod for her leading role in the Central do Brasil (Central Station), which tells the story of a young boy's friendship with a jaded middle-aged woman. Montenegro made Oscar history as the first actress to be nominated for a Portuguese-speaking role.

Best Actress, Central Station, 71st Academy Awards, Nominated

55. oscars_5_Benicio del Toro

Talk about a sweep. Two-time Oscar nominee Benicio del Toro won an Academy Award, a Golden Globe, a Screen Actors Guild Award and a BAFTA for his supporting role as Mexican police officer Javier Rodríguez in Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama Traffic, which explores the illegal drug trade from a number of perspectives: a user, an enforcer, a politician and a trafficker. What makes the Puerto Rican actor’s feat even more impressive: del Toro’s character spoke only Spanish to his fellow Mexican characters while talking to each other, making him the first and only actor to win for a Spanish-speaking role.

Best Supporting Actor, Traffic, 73rd Academy Awards, Won
Best Supporting Actor, 21 Grams, 76th Academy Awards, Nominated

 

56. oscars_30_Alejandro González Iñárritu

Alejandro González Iñárritu is Mexico’s moviemaking king. The filmmaker, the first Mexican director to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director for helming and producing Babel, actually received his first Oscar nomination years earlier (in the Best Foreign Language Film category) for directing  Amores perros. The film was the first in Iñárritu's trilogy of death, followed by 21 Grams and Babel. His four feature films Amores perros, 21 Grams, Babel and Biutiful have gained critical acclaim worldwide, including 12 Academy Award nominations.

Best Foreign Language Film, Amores Perros, 73rd Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Director, Babel, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Picture, Babel, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, Biutiful, 83rd Academy Awards, Nominated

57. oscars_73_Javier Bardem

Javier Bardem – the first Spaniard to garner an Academy Award nomination for his performance as Cuban poet and novelist Reinaldo Arenas in Before Night Falls – claimed his first Oscar at the 80th Academy Awards for his role as an psychopathic assassin in No Country for Old Men, proving that sometimes evil does pay. He’d later become the first Spanish actor to be nominated twice in the leading category for his work in Biutiful. Could his performance in Skyfall earn him a nod this year?

Best Actor, Before Night Falls, 73rd Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Supporting Actor, No Country for Old Men, 80th Academy Awards, Won
Best Actor, Biutiful, 83rd Academy Awards, Nominated

58. oscars_74_Joaquin Phoenix

Joaquin Phoenix, born Joaquín Rafael Bottom in the Río Piedras sector of San Juan, Puerto Rico, gained international attention for his portrayal of Commodus in the 2000 historical epic film Gladiator, a role that earned him a Best Supporting Actor nod, as well as attention from the Golden Globes, the Screen Actors Guild and BAFTA. But it was his starring role as Johnny Cash in the biopic Walk the Line that earned him some of the best reviews of his career, and a Best Actor nod.

Best Supporting Actor, Gladiator, 73rd Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Actor, Walk the Line, 78th Academy Awards, Nominated

59. oscars_32_Carlos Bolado

Mexican filmmaker Carlos Bolado, along with Justine Shapiro and B.Z. Goldberg, earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary Feature for directing Promises, a film that examines the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the perspectives of seven children living in the Palestinian communities in the West Bank and Israeli neighborhoods of Jerusalem.

Best Documentary Feature, Promises, 74th Academy Awards, Nominated

60. oscars_75_Juan Jose Campanella

Juan José Campanella’s El hijo de la novia, a 2001 Spanish-language dramedy about a man’s midlife crisis, earned the Argentine director an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film. And while he’d lose the award at the 74th Academy Awards, he’d earn a second chance at Oscar glory with 2009’s film El secreto de sus ojos. The picture won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film at the 82nd Academy Awards, and, with 1985's The Official Story, made Argentina the first country in Latin America to win it twice.

Best Foreign Language Film, El hijo de la novia, 74th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Foreign Language Film, El secreto de sus ojos, 82nd Academy Awards, Won

61. oscars_7_Salma Hayek

Kahlo Hollywood! In one of her first major projects as a film producer, Salma Hayek earned critical acclaim and a Best Actress nod for her role in Frida, a biopic about the life of Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. The Mexican actress – who performed the Mexican folk song La Bruja with the band Los Vega in the film – may have lost the Oscar to Nicole Kidman, but she gained Hollywood’s respect for her dramatic turn.

Best Actress, Frida, 75th Academy Awards, Nominated

62. oscars_19_Felipe Fernández del Paso Hania Robledo

If you loved the look of Salma Hayek’s Frida, you should thank art director Felipe Fernández del Paso and set decorator Hania Robledo. The dynamic duo, who earned a Best Art Direction nomination for their work, were the masterminds behind the production design of the film, which the American Film Institute named as one of their Movies of the Year 2002, Official Selection. Their rationale: “Frida is a movie about art that is a work of art in itself. The film's unique visual language takes us into an artist's head and reminds us that art is best enjoyed when it moves, breathes and is painted on a giant canvas, as only the movies can provide.”

Best Art Direction, Frida, 75th Academy Awards, Nominated

63. oscars_76_Beatrice De Alba

It’s no small feat replicating Frida Kahlo’s iconic trenzas… But that’s exactly what Mexican hairstylist Beatrice De Alba did when Salma Hayek starred as the Mexican artist in Frida. And De Alba was rewarded for her hair and makeup efforts, winning the Academy Award for Best Makeup at the 75th Academy Awards with makeup artist John E. Jackson. De Alba has most recently served as a hairstylist on The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1, Lindsay Lohan’s Liz & Dick television movie and the now shooting The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

Best Makeup, Frida, 75th Academy Awards, Won

64. oscars_77_Carlos Carrera

Mexican director Carlos Carrera’s El crimen del Padre Amaro, starring Gael García Bernal as a priest struggling between desire and obedience, caused controversy on the part of Roman Catholic groups in Mexico who tried to stop the film from being screened. They failed in their efforts, and the Spanish-language film became the biggest box office draw ever in the country, beating previous record holder, Sexo, pudor y lágrimas; and the film went on to earn an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film.

Best Foreign Language Film, El crimen del Padre Amaro, 75th Academy Awards, Nominated

65. oscars_78_Pablo Helman

Pablo Helman has worked on some of Hollywood’s biggest blockbusters, including Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, Independence Day and Men in Black. But it’s his work on Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones and War of the Worlds that earned him the two Oscar nominations of his blockbuster career.

Best Visual Effects, Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones, 75th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Visual Effects, War of the Worlds, 78th Academy Awards, Nominated 

66. oscars_29_Fernando Meirelles

Fernando Meirelles read Paulo Lins' semi-autobiographical novel City of God, about three young men and their lives in a favela in western Rio de Janeiro where Lins grew up. The Brazilian filmmaker decided to adapt it to film, and that he’d pick the actors from among the inhabitants of the city’s slums. Meirelles and his team selected 200, with whom they worked on the film, which became a national and international success, earning him an Academy Award nomination for Best Director. Critic Roger Ebert gave the film a four-star review, writing "City of God churns with furious energy as it plunges into the story of the slum gangs of Rio de Janeiro. Breathtaking and terrifying, urgently involved with its characters, it announces a new director of great gifts and passions: Fernando Meirelles. Remember the name."

Best Director, City of God, 76th Academy Awards, Nominated

67. oscars_24_César Charlone

Uruguayan-born Brazilian film director, screenwriter, actor and cinematographer César Charlone earned an Academy Award nomination in the Best Cinematography category for his work on Fernando Meirelles’ highly regarded Brazilian crime drama City of God. Charlone would go on to direct his first feature film, The Pope's Toilet, which was selected by Uruguay as the country’s official submission for the 80th Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film race. A year earlier, he was invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Best Cinematography, City of God, 76th Academy Awards, Nominated 

68. oscars_79_Daniel Rezende

It takes a village… And when they create a film like City of God, everyone deserves recognition. Daniel Rezende, like the film’s director Fernando Meirelles and cinematographer César Charlone, earned an Academy Award nomination for his work on the critically acclaimed film. The Brazilian film editor garnered the nod in the Best Film Editing category. And he won the BAFTA Award for Best Editing for his work on the 2002 film. Rezende has described the editing process of City of God, saying he tried to "provoke differing sensations in each of the film's phases."

Best Film Editing, City of God, 76th Academy Awards, Nominated

69. oscars_80_Braulio Mantovani

Brazilian screenwriter Bráulio Mantovani wrote the script for the short film Palace II, directed by Fernando Meirelles in 2001. But it was their partnership a year later, on the critically acclaimed film City of God, which earned him Hollywood cred. Mantovani garnered an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay for penning the Portuguese script from the 1997 novel of the same name, written by Paulo Lins.

Best Adapted Screenplay, City of God, 76th Academy Awards, Nominated

70. oscars_Carlos Bosch & Josep Maria Domènech

Spanish filmmakers Carlos Bosch and Josep Maria Domènech earned an Academy Award nomination in the Best Documentary Feature category for co-directing the 2002 Spanish documentary Balseros, about Cubans leaving during the Período Especial. As a consequence of the widespread poverty that came with the end of economic support from the former USSR, 37,191 Cubans left Cuba in 1994, unimpeded by the Cuban government, using anything they could find or build to get to Florida. Most left with improvised rafts, which weren’t often seaworthy, and some even hijacked a ferry. The documentary consists largely of interviews with the rafters over the course of seven years and focuses on the lives of seven of those refugees, from the building of their rafts to their attempts at building new lives in America, giving insight into daily life in Cuba and the USA in those days.

Best Documentary Feature, Balseros, 76th Academy Awards, Nominated

71. oscars_Alejandro Amenábar

Chilean-Spanish film director Alejandro Amenábar’s The Sea Inside – starring Javier Bardem as a real-life Galician ship mechanic left quadriplegic after a diving accident, and his 29-year campaign in support of euthanasia and the right to end his life – won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film at the 77th Academy Awards, as well as the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film, and 14 Goya Awards including Best Film, Best Director, Best Lead Actor, Best Lead Actress, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress and Best Original Screenplay.

Best Foreign Language Film, The Sea Inside (Mar Adentro), 77th Academy Awards, Won

72. oscars_Manolo García

Spanish makeup artist Manolo García has been nominated the Goya Award, Spain’s equivalent to the Oscars, for Best Makeup and Hairstyles four times. But it was his work with Jo Allen on Alejandro Amenábar’s The Sea Inside that finally won him the Goya, as well as earned him Academy Award nomination for Best Makeup. The Sea Inside became the first Spanish-produced film to be nominated for Oscar in a craft/technical category.

Best Makeup, The Sea Inside, 77th Academy Awards, Nominated

73. oscars_Jorge Drexler

Singer/songwriter Jorge Drexler made Oscar history when the song he’d penned for The Motorcycle Diaries, entitled “Al otro lado del río" won the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 77th Academy Awards. It became the first Spanish song, and only the second in a foreign language, to receive the honor. And Drexler became the first Uruguayan to win an Academy Award. Oscars ceremony producers wouldn’t let the then relatively unknown Drexler perform the song during the show for fear of losing ratings, so the song was performed by Carlos Santana and Antonio Banderas. Later in the evening, while picking up the award, Drexler’s acceptance speech consisted of him singing a few lines of his song a cappella, and he closed by simply saying "Chau."

Best Original Song, The Motorcycle Diaries, 77th Academy Awards, Won

74. oscars_8_Catalina Sandino Moreno

Maria Full of Grace, a Spanish-language film about a pregnant-Colombian-teenager-turned-drug-mule who ingests 62 wrapped pellets of heroin to smuggle into the U.S., only made $12.5 million worldwide. But the hard-to-swallow film did earn the film’s unknown star, Catalina Sandino Moreno international acclaim, as well as a surprising Best Actress nod. Along with becoming the first Colombian to be nominated for an Academy Award, she was the first actress to be nominated for a Spanish-speaking role.

Best Actress, Maria Full of Grace, 77th Academy Awards, Nominated

75. oscars_Montxo Armendáriz

Spanish filmmaker Montxo Armendáriz’s Secretos del corazón is described as “a poetical and emotional movie that can share with Hollywood's big overproductions' special effects," according to the film’s producer. Taking place during the holidays, the film centers on a boy who is attracted by a secret, concealed in the closed room where his father died. His curiosity will be satisfied and lead him to a surprising discovery. It earned a Best Foreign Language Film nomination, as well as four Goya Awards.

Best Foreign Language Film, Secretos del corazón, 77th Academy Awards, Nominated

76. oscars_Nacho Vigalondo

Spanish filmmaker Nacho Vigalondo earned an Academy Award nomination in the Best Live Action Short category for his eight-minute long black and white film 7:35 de la mañana, which tells the story of a suicide bomber and his love for a Spanish woman. It may sound like a horrible scene out of 24, but wait until the last seconds before the credits roll for an ending that will change your mind.

Best Live Action Short, 7:35 de la mañana, 77th Academy Awards, Nominated

77. oscars_Gustavo Santaolalla

Grammy- and Latin Grammy-winning music icon Gustavo Santaolalla made his mark in Hollywood when he struck Oscar gold for two consecutive years... The Argentine musician, film composer and producer earned his first Academy Award for Best Original Score for Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain in 2006; and Santaolalla returned a year later to pick up the statuette in the same category for his work on Alejandro González Iñárritu’s  Babel in 2007.

Best Original Score, Brokeback Mountain, 78th Academy Awards, Won
Best Original Score, Babel, 79th Academy Awards, Won

78. oscars_25_Rodrigo Prieto

Mexican cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto, noted for his unconventional use of the camera often combined with strong moody lighting, has worked with noted directors Spike Lee, Oliver Stone and Alejandro González Iñárritu (on the acclaimed Amores Perros, 21 Grams, Babel and Biutiful). But Prieto’s most notable work, and sole Academy Award nomination, is Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain. He not only shot the film, he also appeared in a cameo role as a Mexican gigolo whom Jake Gyllenhaal's character, Jack Twist, meets. He most recently worked on Ben Affleck’s Argo.

Best Cinematography, Brokeback Mountain, 78th Academy Awards, Nominated

79. oscars_Alberto Iglesias

Alberto Iglesias is the Iberian Peninsula’s Music Man… The Spanish composer, who has written the music for several of Pedro Almodóvar’s films, including The Skin I Live In and Volver, has earned three Oscar nominations for Best Original Score in his career, for his music for The Constant Gardener, The Kite Runner and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. And while he’s yet to win an Academy Award, Iglesias has won nine Goya Awards and was named the 2012 Soundtrack Composer of the Year for Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and The Skin I Live In at the World Soundtrack Awards.

Best Original Score, The Constant Gardener, 78th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Original Score, The Kite Runner, 80th Academy Awards Nominated
Best Original Score, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, 84th Academy Awards, Nominated

80. oscars_penelop cruz

It’s no wonder Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem are Spain’s first couple of cinema; they each have a total of three Oscar nods, with one win apiece. Cruz, who earned a Best Actress nomination for her work in Pedro Almodóvar’s Spanish-language film Volver, earned her Oscar in the Best Supporting Actress category for her performance in Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona. And, she followed that up with another Best Supporting Actress nod the following year for her acting, singing and dancing skills in the musical Nine.

Best Actress, Volver, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Supporting Actress, Vicky Cristina Barcelona, 81st Academy Awards, Won
Best Supporting Actress, Nine, 82nd Academy Awards, Nominated

81. oscars_Guillermo del Toro

More than 20 years after directing his first short film Doña Lupe (1985), Guillermo del Toro earned massive Hollywood respect for writing, directing and producing the Spanish-language dark fantasy film Pan’s Labyrinth. The critically acclaimed film, which interweaves the real world five years after the Spanish Civil War with a fantasy world centered around an overgrown abandoned labyrinth and a mysterious faun creature, earned del Toro two Academy Award nominations, Best Foreign Language Film and Best Original Screenplay, making the Mexican director a hot commodity in Hollywood.

Best Foreign Language Film, Pan’s Labyrinth, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Original Screenplay, Pan’s Labyrinth, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated

82. oscars_20_Eugenio Caballero

Guillermo del Toro’s Pan’s Labyrinth has been described by one critic as "an epic, poetic vision in which the grim realities of war are matched and mirrored by a descent into an underworld populated by fearsomely beautiful monsters." And the Mexican dark fantasy film’s art director Eugenio Caballero (Mexico) and set decorator Pilar Revuelta  (Spain) were duly recognized for creating both worlds, winning the Academy Award for Best Art Direction.

Best Art Direction, Pan’s Labyrinth, 79th Academy Awards, Won 

 

83. oscars_14_Adriana Baraza

In Mexican director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s drama Babel, which tells multiple stories that take place in Morocco, Japan, Mexico and the U.S., Adriana Baraza manages to outshine two of Hollywood’s elite: Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett. The former telenovela star’s distressing role as an undocumented Mexican nanny trying to get the children in her care back into the country didn’t just move audiences, it resulted in a Best Supporting Actress nod in a year when 10 Mexicans were nominated at the 79th Academy Awards.

Best Supporting Actress, Babel, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated

84. oscars_Guillermo Arriaga

Alejandro González Iñárritu’s longtime collaborating partner Guillermo Arriaga worked with the noted Mexican director on his death trilogy (Amores perros, 21 Grams and Babel). But it was the Mexican author and filmmaker’s work on the final installment (Babel) that would earn him Hollywood recognition. Arriaga received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay for his work on the project.

Best Original Screenplay, Babel, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated

85. oscars_26_Guillermo Navarro

Guillermo Navarro, a frequent collaborator of Guillermo del Toro and Robert Rodriguez, has a filmography that runs the gamut from small arthouse films to big-budget action flicks. But the Mexican cinematographer’s most notable work is del Toro’s critically acclaimed dark fantasy film Pan’s Labyrinth, which won him an Academy Award for Best Cinematography. Navarro most recent made his directing debut, helming a 2012 music video for actress/singer Mia Maestro titled “Blue Eyed Sailor.”

Best Cinematography, Pan’s Labyrinth, 79th Academy Awards, Won

86. oscars_Alfonso Cuarón & Carlos Cuarón

There’s no denying that Alfonso Cuarón’s Y tu mamá también is a classic film. Not just in Mexico, but throughout the world. But the Mexican director wasn’t the only mastermind behind the film. His brother Carlos Cuarón helped pen the coming-of-age-story that made Diego Luna and Gael García Bernal famous. The pair were rewarded for their efforts when they received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay, which they lost to another Spanish language script: Pedro Almodóvar’s Hable con ella. Despite the loss, Alfonso Cuarón would go on to be a rising star in Hollywood and earn two additional Oscar nod’s for 2006’s Children of Men: Best Film Editing and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Best Original Screenplay, Y tu mamá también, 75th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Film Editing , Children of Men, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay , Children of Men, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated

87. oscars_Borja Cobeaga

Borja Cobeaga isn’t short on talent… The Spanish filmmaker earned an Academy Award nomination in the Best Live Action Short category for the Spanish-language film Éramos pocos.

Best Live Action Short, Éramos pocos, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated

88. oscars_Javier Fesser & Luis Manso

Borja Cobeaga wasn’t the only Spaniard nominated in the Best Live Action Short at the 79th Academy Awards. Javier Fesser and Luis Manso also received a nod in the category for their Spanish-Senegalese short film Binta y la gran idea. The 31-minute film, made in collaboration with UNICEF, centers on a young African girl with a bright idea.

Best Live Action Short, Binta y la gran idea, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated

89. oscars_Javier Navarrete

Spanish composer Javier Navarrete has scored several films, but Pan’s Labyrinth remains the feather in his cap. His haunting musical work on the project, his second with Mexican director Guillermo del Toro, earned him an Academy Award nod Best Original Score, as well as a Grammy nomination for Best Compilation Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media. Navarrete most recently scored HBO’s critically acclaimed Hemingway & Gellhorn and the sequel to Clash of the Titans, Wrath of the Titans.

Best Original Score, Pan’s Labyrinth, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated

90. oscars_David Martí & Montse Ribé

David Martí and Montse Ribé have the makeup of winners. Literally! The Spanish makeup and special effects specialists won the Academy Award for Makeup for their complex makeup work on Guillermo del Toro’s Pan's Labyrinth. Their work on Doug Jones, who portrays the Faun and the Pale Man in the film, took an average of five hours in Martí and Ribé’s makeup chair each day to perfect.

Best Makeup, Pan’s Labyrinth, 79th Academy Awards, Won

91. oscars_Fernando Cámara

Sound engineer Fernando Cámara has worked on more than 30 films since 1979, including The Legend of Zorro, Romeo + Juliet and Love in the Time of Cholera.  But it’s his work on Mel Gibson’s 2006 Mayan action-drama Apocalypto that earned him the only Academy Award nomination of his career, for Best Sound Mixing.

Best Sound Mixing, Apocalypto, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated ­

92. oscars_Alex Rodriguez

He may not play professional baseball, but this Alex Rodríguez hits homeruns in Hollywood. The French-born Mexican film editor, who has edited several films directed by Alfonso Cuarón, earned an Academy Award nomination for Film Editing for his work with the Mexican director on 2006’s Children of Men. Critic Wesley Morris described their work as follows: "Children of Men has a blistering immediacy that's singular in this age of rapid cutting. Along with Alex Rodríguez, Cuarón cut the picture himself, and while he uses digital effects as enrichment, he builds scenes within the camera's frame rather than just in an editing room. So the film is as theatrical as it is cinematic."

Best Film Editing, Children of Men, 79th Academy Awards, Nominated

93. oscars_35_Isabel Vega

Colombian filmmaker Isabel Vega and Amanda Micheli earned an Academy Award nomination in the Best Documentary Short category for directing La Corona, a 40-minute documentary about a beauty pageant in a prison for women.

Best Documentary Short, La Corona (The Crown), 80th Academy Awards, Nominated

94. oscars_27_Claudio Miranda

Chilean cinematographer Claudio Miranda worked as a gaffer on Seven, The Game and Fight Club, before getting a promotion and earning raves as the director of photography on David Fincher's film The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. Miranda’s impressive work resulted in on the Brad Pitt-starrer becoming the first entirely digitally filmed movie nominated for an Academy Award for Best Cinematography and an American Society of Cinematographers Award. And he just earned his second Oscar nod in the category for his awe-inspiring work on Ang Lee’s 3D adventure drama Life of Pi.

Best Cinematography, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, 81st Academy Awards, Nominated
Best Cinematography, Life of Pi, 85th Academy Awards, Nominated

95. oscars_Mike Elizalde

It takes a lot of work (and red paint) to turn Ron Perlman into the super-strong demon Hellboy. So it’s no surprise that Mexican special effects whiz Mike Elizalde earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Makeup his work on Guillermo del Toro’s supernatural superhero film  Hellboy II: The Golden Army. Most recently, he’s reteamed with del Toro as the creature effects person on the Mexican director’s highly anticipated sci-fi flick Pacific Rim.

Best Makeup, Hellboy II: The Golden Army, 81st Academy Awards, Nominated

96. oscars_Claudia Llosa (Peru)

Peruvian director Claudia Llosa made history when her 2009 film, The Milk of Sorrow, earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film. The film, in Spanish and Quechua, addresses the fears of abused women during Peru's recent history of violence because of the uprising of the Maoist group Sendero Luminoso and the actions of the paramilitary and state armed forces. Milk of Sorrow is the first and only Peruvian film to be nominated in the category.  

Best Foreign Language Film, The Milk of Sorrow, 82nd Academy Awards, Nominated 

97. oscars_Javier Recio Gracia

Before working as a storyboard artist on DreamWorks Animation’s Rise of the Guardians, Javier Recio Gracia earned Hollywood’s attention, and an Oscar nod in the Best Animated Short category, for his film La Dama y la Muerte. The Spanish 3D imaging animated short, produced by Antonio Banderas, didn’t win an Academy Award, but it dud earn a Goya Award for being the Best Animated Short of 2009.

Best Animated Short, La Dama y la Muerte (The Lady and the Reaper), 82nd Academy Awards, Nominated

98. oscars_3_demian bichir

In what would turn out to be highly competitive year in the Best Actor race, Demián Bichir shocked Mexican and American audiences last year when he beat out higher-profile actors like Leonardo DiCaprio (J. Edgar) and Ryan Gosling (The Ides of March) for a coveted Oscar nomination for his heart-wrenching performance as an undocumented Mexican gardener struggling to provide for his son in A Better Life, a critically acclaimed film that earned only $1.7 million at the box office. Bichir’s recognition included nominations from the Screen Actors Guild, the ALMA Awards and the Independent Spirit Awards.

Best Actor, A Better Life, 84th Academy Awards, Nominated

99. oscars_15_Bérénice Bejo

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Bérénice Bejo’s performance in the black-and-white silent film The Artist – last year’s Academy Award winner for Best Picture – is nothing short of praiseworthy. The Argentina-born actress steals the show as Peppy Miller, a bright-eyed aspiring actress with a heart of gold. The role earned her a Best Supporting Actress nod, as well as Best Actress win at the César Awards, France’s equivalent of the Oscars.

Best Supporting Actress, The Artist, 84th Academy Awards, Nominated

100. oscars_Sergio Mendes & Carlinhos Brown

Grammy-winning Brazilian musician Sérgio Mendes added Academy Award nominee to his remarkable resume when he partnered with fellow Brazilian musician Carlinhos Brown and African American singer/songwriter Siedah Garrett to pen “Real in Rio,” a song for the 3D computer-animated musical comedy Rio. The colorful samba-pop song earned a Best Original Song nomination, making Mendes and Brown the first Brazilian songwriters to be nominated together, and Brown the first Latin songwriter of African descent to be nominated.

Best Original Song, Rio, 84th Academy Awards, Nominated

101. oscars_Paco Delgado

Spanish costume designer Paco Delgado has earned his first Academy Award nomination for Best Costume Design for his eye-catching costumes in Tom Hooper's Les Misérables. Delgado – who previously worked on Biutiful, The Skin I Live In and Blancanieves – oversaw the creation of more than 2,200 outfits for the cast of the epic film adaptation of the Broadway musical.

Best Costume Design, Les Misérables, 85th Academy Awards, Nominated

102. oscars_Pablo Larraín

Chilean filmmaker Pablo Larraín has earned his first Academy Award nomination  for directing the Spanish-language drama No, starring Gael García Bernal as an in-demand advertising executive who develops a campaign that helps overthrow Chilean military dictator Augusto Pinochet’s regime. Based on a true story, No has already earned raves throughout the world, and it earned the Art Cinema Award at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Could an Oscar be next?

 

Best Foreign Language Film, No, 85th Academy Awards, Nominated

103. oscars_José Antonio García

He earned critical acclaim for his sound mixing on Mexican director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Babel, including BAFTA and Satellite Award nods. The Mexican sound mixer, however, didn’t make the shortlist for an Academy Award nomination that year. But that’s all changed this year. García has just set a date with Oscar, with his nomination in the Best Sound Mixing category for his impressive work on Ben Affleck’s Argo, which is based on the Canadian Caper that took place during the Iran hostage crisis in 1979 and 1980.

Best Sound Mixing, Argo, 85th Academy Awards, Nominated