Introducing Pitbull’s New Protégé, Sensato

There’s a new Latino lyricist emerging in music – and he comes with already-lengthy credentials.

Dominican urban artist Sensato (born William Reyna) is best known for his wild success with “Watagatapitusberry, an infectious (and somewhat nonsensical) song that blazed through the radio two years ago. The song’s popularity skyrocketed so that Lil Jon and Cuban American rapper Pitbull joined in on its official remix. 

This fall, the 27-year-old teamed up with Mr. Worldwide for a club-ready record titled “Latinos in Paris, which saw its music video premiere this past weekend. Sensato’s music cred continues to grow; he also has a new single out titled “Crazy People, which also features Pitbull and Spanish DJ/producer Sak Noel.

As a young boy in the Dominican Republic, Sensato began rapping good messages in church. When he moved to New York at 13, Sensato’s taste in music expanded to hip-hop. Over a decade has passed since then, and the future looks promising for the lyricist looks promising. Sensato spoke to Latina.com recently about what it was like to work with Pitbull and who influences him musically.

Check out our full interview with Sensato below, as well as his new music video for “Latinos in Paris” with Pitbull!

Tell me about your single “Latinos in Paris” – how did that come about?

As a rapper with influence of Dominican Republic and New York City, I always do Spanish-version remixes of famous hip-hop tracks. A lot of people were telling me to get on this song (“Ni**** in Paris” by Jay-Z and Kanye West). I happened to be on tour with Pitbull and I pick up my computer and pulled out the beat [of the song] to start writing to it. Pitbull sits next to me, sees what I’m doing, and said, ‘I’m going to get on that with you.’ And I was like, ‘Hell yea! Of course!’ The next day, we were backstage somewhere and Pitbull said, ‘Yo papo, I already recorded that!’ He actually flew in his engineer to his hotel and recorded his part.

What is it like working with Pitbull?

He’s someone that inspires me 24/7 and being able to actually see the real deal through him is a blessing. I met Pit through the remix of “Watagatapitusberry.” Ever since that connection, we have always kept in touch. He would just always help me out with no type of attachment.

We wanted to take it back a bit and talk about your success with “Watagatapitusberry,” which was huge! Did you think that would happen?

That song was sitting in the studio for a long time. We had started it, I had already done the intro. We were going to do a track about alcohol – “Henny con cranberry,” you know, Hennessey with cranberry. One night in the studio, we saw that and made up this story about someone that’s going to say something and can’t really say it. Like someone trying to speak English and that’s where we came up with “Watagatapitusberry.” That was just a made-up word. Before the track came out, we put a camera and acted out the song and released a YouTube video of it. In a matter of days, we had thousands and thousands of views. That was a YouTube momentum.

The power of YouTube…

Exactly! Pretty much.

What inspires your lyrics?

A lot of my lyrics have to do with a lot of love songs that I have. When it’s not a crazy, funny party song, I have serious songs, which have a lot to do with my own life.

Which Latin artists do you look up to?

Juan Luis Guerra because first of all, he’s Dominican, and he also took merengue to the next level. I also look up to Lil Wayne, Jay-Z, and Calle 13. I look up to a lot of people who do their thing out there, you know?

What’s next for you?

Right now, I’m currently working on my seventh mix tape and we’re in the process of getting this deal with Pitbull also. I’m working on singles. After “Watagatapitusberry,” I also did a track remix called “El Malo” with Romeo Santos from Aventura.

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